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A nice and classic Supac Manufacturing Co. Ltd. 1944 dated black beret

This is a good example of a nice and classic Supac Manufacturing Co. Ltd. 1944 dated black beret. After the end of the Great War the Royal Tank Regiment finally had time to develop a unique uniform for the new service. One of the problems faced by tank crews was the dirty and cramped condition within early tanks. Traditional service dress caps were too bulky and were too easily soiled or damaged. Taking inspiration from the 70th Chasseurs Alpins, billeted nearby, General Eles the commander of the RTR recommended the black beret be adopted as a distinctive and practical choice of head wear. Wrangling with the War Office meant it was 1924 before the King finally signed off and approved the adoption of the black beret which was to become the Tank Corps distinguishing feature. This beret dates from the end of the Second World War and is made of black cloth with a leather binding to the brim. Inside the cap is clearly marked as having been made in 1944 by Supac and that it is a size 6 1/2. The beret is in a nicely condition with some minor wear.

Code: 51190Price: 110.00 EUR


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A neat example of a nice un-issued embroided mid war period standard type Parachute Regiment shoulder title

This is a perfect example of a nice un-issued embroided mid war period standard type Parachute Regiment shoulder title.
These embroided shoulder titles were introduced half way trough 1943. The title has a dark blue lettering on pale blue backing and is in a nicely condition. Difficult to find these days. Simply a nice example of this shought after shoulder title!

Code: 51189Price:


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A nice and issued early red (brick) Infantry Battalion cotton lanyard

This is a neat example of a nice and issued early red cotton lanyard. These cotton lanyards were standard issued to some of the army units. These red lanyards were mainly worn by the members of B.Company of the 2nd Battalion, the South Staffordshire Regiment. This example is in a nice and issued condition.

Code: 51188Price:


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A standard wartime capbadge to the Parachute Regiment

This is a neat example of standard wartime Parachute Regiment beret badge. Heavy quality white metal. in a good and nice condition.

Code: 51187Price:


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A very nice un-issued and unfortunately single example of a embroided i.e. taylor made Pegasus arm formation sign

This is a very nice and issued single right facing Pegasus formation sign. These not standard made Pegasus signs were mostly taylor i.e local made en favorite by the Officers. This example is in a perfect and issued condtion. Hard to find these days.

Code: 51186Price:


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A nice '40 ATS (Auxiliary Territorial Service) service dress/battle dress shoulder lanyard

This is a neat little '40 ATS (Auxiliary Territorial Service) service dress/battle dress shoulder lanyard. The Auxiliary Territorial Service was the women's branch of the British Army during the Second World War. It was formed on 9 September 1938, initially as a women's voluntary service, and existed until 1 February 1949, when it was merged into the Women's Royal Army Corps. Prior to the Second World War, the government decided to establish a new Corps for women, and an advisory council, which included members of the Territorial Army (TA), a section of the Women's Transport Service (FANY) and the Women's Legion, was set up. The council decided that the ATS would be attached to the Territorial Army, and the women serving would receive two thirds the pay of male soldiers. This example is in a nice issued condition. Difficult to find these days.

Code: 51185Price:


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A nice and issued highly detailed white metal Army Air Corps cap badge

This is a good example of a issued white metal Army Air Corps beret badge and mainly worn by members of the Glider Pilot Regiment. The AAC badge was also worn by the early members of the Parachute Regiment in North Africa. This example is in a perfect condition and has two copper coloured lugs to the back and has never been cleaned. Difficult to find these days.

Code: 51184Price: 35.00 EUR


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A nice messing metal all ranks small Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry beret badge

This is a neat example of a nice messing metal all ranks small Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry beret badge. The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was a light infantry regiment of the British Army that existed from 1881 until 1958, serving in the Second Boer War, World War I and World War II. The 2nd Battalion, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry returned to England in July 1940, after having served in British India and Burma for the last eighteen years. The battalion, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel L.W. Giles, became part of the 31st Independent Brigade Group, serving alongside 1st Battalion, Border Regiment, 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment and 1st Battalion, Royal Ulster Rifles, all Regular Army battalions, the latter two having also served in British India before the war.

In October 1941 the battalion, together with the rest of the 31st Brigade, was re-roled as an airborne, specifically as glider infantry, and the 31st Brigade was redesignated the 1st Airlanding Brigade and became part of the 1st Airborne Division. In mid-1943 it was transferred, along with the 1st Royal Ulster Rifles, to become part of the 6th Airlanding Brigade in 6th Airborne Division. The 2nd Ox and Bucks were due to take part in the invasion of Sicily (Operation Husky); however in April 1943 the battalion was advised that the 1st Airborne and not the 6th Airborne were to be deployed in the landings. As part of Operation Deadstick just before the landings on D-Day on 6 June 1944, D Company commanded by Major John Howard as well as 30 Royal Engineers and men of the Glider Pilot Regiment (a total of 181 men), were to land in six Horsa gliders to capture the vital structure which became known as Pegasus Bridge over the Caen Canal and the bridge over the Orne River which became known as Horsa Bridge and was east of Pegasus. Their capture was intended to secure the eastern flank to prevent German armour from reaching the British 3rd Infantry Division that was due to commence landing on Sword Beach at 07:25hrs. This example is in a perfect and un-issued condition with is fitted with it's Original cutter pin. Difficult to find these days.

Code: 51183Price: 40.00 EUR


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A neat example of a difficult to find mid war period curved Airborne shoulder title

This is a good example of a uncommon curved Airborne shoulder title. These curved Airborne shoulder title were introduced at the beginning of the formation of Airborne Forces and were mainly worn by the units until the were issued with there own shoulder titles. Trough out the war these curved Airborne titles were mainly worn by officers who were not attached to a specific unit. This title is in a overal nice good and issued condition.

Code: 51182Price:


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A nice British made Royal Corps of Signals embroided shoulder title

This is a perfect example of a nice embroided shoulder titel to the Royal Corps of Signals. The title is in a nice un-issued condition. These titles are getting harder to find these days.

Code: 51181Price: 20.00 EUR

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