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A nice and orginal 1943 dated German made Waffen SS so called 'presse foto' of a Canadian POW (Prisoner of War) of the Midland Regiment

This is a good example of a nice and orginal 1943 dated German made Waffen SS so called 'presse foto' of a Canadian POW (Prisoner of War) of the Midland Regiment. The Regiment was not been able to go overseas as a unit but some members of the Regiment were used as a re-inforcement for other units. So more likely Jean Simpson as the man is called on the photo is one of these re-inforcements. The photograph still retains its original (machine-typed) press information page glued to back. This large-sized picture - it measures 18.0 x 24,5 cms - is neatly printed in a black and white on a semy glossy paper. These propaganda-type ‘high-quality’ photos were for example used to illustrate the various magazines and/or newspapers. A simply and nice unsual item!

Code: 51158Price: 25.00 EUR


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A nice un-issued and mid war period standard British parachute qualification wing

I was lucky to find two identical British made mid war period parachute qualification wings in a perfect and pristine condition. The parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in different shapes and sizes. The parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. These wings are in a nicely un-issued condition and they are of course priced per single piece !

Code: 51157Price: 65.00 EUR


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A good example of a early single red on black Commando shoulder title

This is a good example of a early wartime, regrettably single, red on black commando shouder title. Worn in the early stage of forming the Commando units before the use of the numbered shoulder titles. A nice commando title in a un-issued condition.

Code: 51156Price:


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A nice issued and mid war period standard British parachute qualification wing

This a fine example of a standard British made mid war period parachute qualification wing. The parachute qualification wing was introduced in early 1941 for everyone who had passed the Parachute Training school located at Ringway near Manchester Airport. These wings came in different shapes and sizes. The parachute qualification wing was issued after the soldier had qualified for them after 8 jumps. 2 from a balloon and 6 from a aircraft. This wing is in a nicely issued condition.

Code: 51155Price: 65.00 EUR


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A nice example of Get Tough ! by Major W.E. Fairbairn

This is a good example of a 1942 dated nicely used Get Tough ! by Major W.E. Fairbairn. The father of modern hand-to-hand combat, Capt. W. E. Fairbairn, taught the famed British Commandos from this classic, long-out-of-print manual on unarmed combat. Known for his "get tough" attitude, Fairbairn designed these practical methods after years of training troops and watching ruffians, thugs, bandits and bullies. On page 85 (see photo) there had been a paperclip in the past and have been left a mark on the page with a little pin hole. Other wise this copy is in a nicely issued condition.

Code: 51154Price:


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A never seen before nicely bullion made officers quality Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry beret badge

This is a perfect example of a never seen before nicely bullion made officers quality Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry beret badge. The badge is executed in a fine silver bullion thread on a rifle green backing. The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was a light infantry regiment of the British Army that existed from 1881 until 1958, serving in the Second Boer War, World War I and World War II. The 2nd Battalion, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry returned to England in July 1940, after having served in British India and Burma for the last eighteen years. The battalion, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel L.W. Giles, became part of the 31st Independent Brigade Group, serving alongside 1st Battalion, Border Regiment, 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment and 1st Battalion, Royal Ulster Rifles, all Regular Army battalions, the latter two having also served in British India before the war. In October 1941 the battalion, together with the rest of the 31st Brigade, was re-roled as an airborne, specifically as glider infantry, and the 31st Brigade was redesignated the 1st Airlanding Brigade and became part of the 1st Airborne Division. In mid-1943 it was transferred, along with the 1st Royal Ulster Rifles, to become part of the 6th Airlanding Brigade in 6th Airborne Division. The 2nd Ox and Bucks were due to take part in the invasion of Sicily (Operation Husky); however in April 1943 the battalion was advised that the 1st Airborne and not the 6th Airborne were to be deployed in the landings. As part of Operation Deadstick just before the landings on D-Day on 6 June 1944, D Company commanded by Major John Howard as well as 30 Royal Engineers and men of the Glider Pilot Regiment (a total of 181 men), were to land in six Horsa gliders to capture the vital structure which became known as Pegasus Bridge over the Caen Canal and the bridge over the Orne River which became known as Horsa Bridge and was east of Pegasus. Their capture was intended to secure the eastern flank to prevent German armour from reaching the British 3rd Infantry Division that was due to commence landing on Sword Beach at 07:25hrs. This example is in perfect nicely issued condition.

Code: 51153Price:


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A nice printed British made 1st Canadian Infantry Division shoulder divisional sign

This is a good example of a printed British made 1st Canadian Infantry Division shoulder divisional sign. The Canadian 1st Infantry Division was formed at the outbreak of World War I in August 1914. The division was sent to fight on the Western Front in France in February 1915. During World War II the division was mobilized on 1 September, 1939, even before the formal declaration of war, with the 1st Canadian Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade, and the 3rd Canadian Infantry Brigade. The division crossed the Atlantic in two main convoys at the end of 1939, with additional troops reaching the UK at the beginning of February 1940. The unit's insignia was a simple red rectangle. From this, and a fearsome fighting reputation, two generations of German soldiers (in both World Wars) gave the division the nickname "The Red Patch Devils". All elements of the division were far from completely equipped: of the artillery and machine guns on hand, most were obsolescent, and the troops lacked steel helmets. Only gradually did a full complement of more modern weapons, equipment, and transport begin reaching the division in 1940.
Nevertheless, in the wake of the Dunkirk evacuation the Canadians were ordered to France in June 1940. Only the 1st Canadian Infantry Brigade actually arrived on the continent, and it returned almost immediately. The division trained in England for three years before transferring to the Mediterranean to take part in the assault landing on Sicily. It then landed in Calabria and fought its way up the Italian peninsula from Ortona to the Senio with the British 8th Army, earning an excellent reputation along the way. The 1st moved from Italy as part of Operation Goldflake in March 1945, finishing the war in the Netherlands with Canadian 1st Army. This example is in a perfect un-issued condition.

Code: 51152Price: 35.00 EUR


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A nice printed British made 5th Armoured Division Canadian shoulder divisional sign

This is a good example of a printed British made Canadian 5th Armoured Division divisional sign. The 5th Armoured took part in the Italian Campaign until the end of 1944 seeing notable action on the Hitler Line after the Allied breakthrough at Cassino in May 1944 and also during Operation Olive on the Gothic Line in August 1944. During the latter battle its single infantry brigade was augmented by a second, which was raised using reinforcements and units serving in other roles. Among them was 4th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards - 1st Canadian Division's armoured recce unit. As with other Allied armoured divisions in the Mediterranean, local resources were used to establish an additional infantry brigade, the 12th Canadian Infantry Brigade. In January 1945, the division moved by truck, train, and naval transport to Belgium via Livorno and Marseille. After arriving, it disbanded the 12th Brigade, and re-equipped to join the First Canadian Army in time to participate in the final offensives across the Rhine. This divisional sign is in a perfect and a un-issued condition.

Code: 51151Price: 40.00 EUR


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A nice plastic made all ranks Reconnassiance Corps cap badge

This is a neat examle of a nice plastic made standard issued all ranks Reconnassiance Corps cap badge. The Reconnaissance Corps, or simply Recce Corps, was a corps of the British Army, formed during the Second World War whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions. It was formed from infantry brigade reconnaissance groups on 14 January 1941. All the brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant division. This example is in a nice and issued condition.

Code: 51150Price:


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A nice matching set of printed RAMC (Royal Army Medical Corps) shoulder titles

This is a neat set nice and matching printed RAMC (Royal Army Medical Corps) shoulder titles. These printed titles were introduced around '42-'43 because of economic measures. This set in in aperfect and un-issued condition.

Code: 51149Price:

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