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A good un-issued 1st pattern embroided 1st Armoured Division formation badge

This is a neat example of a un-issued 1st pattern embroided 1st Armoured Division formation badge. Until 27 August 1941, the division was stationed in the United Kingdom on anti-invasion duties, anticipating a German invasion, under the command of Major-General Willoughby Norrie, who had taken command on 24 August 1940. It then embarked for Egypt under the command of Major-General Herbert Lumsden and arrived on 13 November 1941. After Major-General Lumsden was wounded, Major-General Frank Messervy took command in January 1942, retaining command until Major-General Lumsden returned in March. The 1st Armoured Division took part in many of the battles of the North African Campaign against Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel, the "Desert Fox", including Gazala, Mersa Matruh, First El Alamein, Second El Alamein, Tebaga Gap, Mareth Line, Akarit, El Kourzia and Tunis. In August 1942, Major-General Raymond Briggs was appointed to command and in July 1943 was succeeded by Major-General Alexander Galloway. From the end of the campaign in Tunisia in May 1943, which saw the surrender of almost 250,000 German and Italian soldiers, the 1st Armoured Division remained in North Africa until May 1944. The division, minus the 18th Lorried Infantry Brigade (previously 7th Motor Brigade, on loan to the 1st Infantry Division in the Anzio beachhead, only rejoining 1st Armoured in August), then transferred to the Italian Front, arriving in Italy in late May.

The division came under command of V Corps, under Lieutenant-General Charles Keightley, of the Eighth Army, commanded by Lieutenant-General Sir Oliver Leese. The 1st Armoured Division was the only British division, of six in total, to have fought at Alamein under Eighth Army command, to rejoin the army in Italy. During the fighting in front of the Gothic Line throughout August and September, the 2nd Armoured Brigade suffered severe losses in tanks in the Battle of Coriano, with the 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays), losing 31 tanks, out of 52. Major-General Richard Hull, aged just 37 and three months who became Chief of the General Staff, took over command for this part of the campaign in August 1944. The division was broken up soon after, due to a lack of sufficient drafts to replace casualties; the 2nd Armoured Brigade survived as an independent brigade and the 18th Infantry Brigade was broken up and used to fill gaps in other British divisions, mainly for the 46th and 56th Infantry Divisions. The division was officially disbanded on 11 January 1945. This example is in a perfect un-issued condition.

Code: 51426Price: 25.00 EUR


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A nice uncommon cut-out (voided) crown capbadge to the Parachute Regiment

This is a neat example of a early war capbadge to the Parachute Regiment. These uncommon voided crown examples do excists in various type's and makers. Mostly these cap badges were privatly purchase by the members of the Regiment. This one is in a perfect and slightly used condition.

Code: 51425Price:


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A nice un-issued single full-worded block type lettering RAMC (Royal Army Medical Corps) shoulder title

This is a great -albeit regrettably single - full-worded block type lettering RAMC (Royal Army Medical Corps) shoulder titles. These early wartime full-worded titles were also issued to the Airborne Medical units like the 133 Parachute Field Ambulance and the 181 Airlanding Field Ambulance. This example has a white block type lettering on a maroon back ground with a black gauze backing. These full-worded titels are harder to find these days.

Code: 51424Price:


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A nice metal made all ranks Reconnassiance Corps cap badge

This is a neat examle of a metal made standard issued all ranks Reconnassiance Corps cap badge. The Reconnaissance Corps, or simply Recce Corps, was a corps of the British Army, formed during the Second World War whose units provided the mobile spearhead of infantry divisions. It was formed from infantry brigade reconnaissance groups on 14 January 1941. All the brigade reconnaissance groups of each infantry corps were formed into reconnaissance battalions, each usually bearing the number of its relevant division. The cap badge is in a nice condition.

Code: 51423Price:


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A nice and early un-issued embroided Scots Guards shoulder title

This is a good example of a nice and early embroided Scots Guards shoulder title. The Scots Guards (SG), is one of the Foot Guards regiments of the British Army. Their origins lie in the personal bodyguard of King Charles I of England and Scotland. It is the oldest formed Regiment in the Regular Army, more so than any other in the Household Brigade. In April 1940, the 1st Battalion, as part of the 24th Guards Brigade, took part in its first campaign of the war, during the expedition to Norway. In North Africa, as part of the 22nd Guards Brigade, the 2nd Battalion took part in fighting against the Italians in Egypt followed by tough fighting in Libya, then also controlled by Italy. In North Africa, in March 1943, the 2nd Battalion took part in the defensive Battle of Medenine, after the Germans had counter-attacked the Allies. In September 1943, the 2nd Battalion, as part of the 201st Guards Brigade of the 56th (London) Division, took part in the Landing at Salerno. In December 1943, the 1st Battalion, as part of 24th Guards Brigade, arrived in the Italian Theatre. At the Battle of Monte Cassino in early 1944, the 2nd Battalion suffered heavy casualties in tough fighting. The 1st Battalion, as part of its brigade, joined the 6th South African Armoured Division in May 1944. The regiment took part in many fierce engagements throughout 1944, including those against the Gothic Line, a formidable defensive line. This example has it's typical early buckram backing and is further is a nice un-issued condition.

Code: 51422Price:


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A nice Canadian/British made nickel plated The Essex Scottish cap badge

This is a nice example of a Canadian/British made nickel plated The Essex Scottish cap badge. During World War II the regiment was among the first Canadian units to see combat in the European theatre during the invasion of Dieppe. By the end of The Dieppe Raid, the Essex Scottish Regiment had suffered 121 fatal casualties, with many others wounded and captured. The Essex Scottish later participated in Operation Atlantic and was slaughtered attempting to take Verrières Ridge on July 21. By the war's end, the Essex Scottish Regiment had suffered over 550 war dead; its 2,500 casualties were the most of any unit in the Canadian army during the Second World War. This example is in a nice issued condition.

Code: 51421Price:


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A perfect Canadian/British made Canadian 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade Medical Corps arm badge

This is a neat example of a Canadian/British made Canadian 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade Medical Corps arm badge. In common with other Canadian formations, the Brigade's corps and services units (ie: Signals, Service Corps, Ordnance, Medical and Chaplains) also wore a distinction superimposed on the central stripe of the new formation patch. This took the form of the initials of the corps in yellow (gold) letters for the RCASC, RCASC and CCS (Canadian Chaplain Service), white letters (RCCS) on a blue tablet for Signals and a cherry tablet with no letters for RCAMC. This example is in a nice un-issued condition.

Code: 51420Price:


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A nice nickel plated KOSB (Kings Own Scottish Borderers) cap badge

This is a good example of a nicely used KOSB (Kings Own Scottish Borderers) nickel plated cap badge. In the period between the wars, the regiment's regular battalions were sent all over the British Empire to Ireland, Egypt and Hong Kong but were quickly recalled home at the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939.

The 1st Battalion landed in France as part of the 9th Brigade in the 3rd Infantry Division in September 1939 for service with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF); it took part in the Dunkirk evacuation in June 1940 and the Normandy landings in June 1944 and saw action at the Battle for Caen later that month. The 2nd Battalion land in Burma as part of the 89th Brigade in the 7th (Indian) Division in September 1943 for service in the Burma Campaign and saw action at the Battle of the Admin Box in February 1944 and the Battle of Imphal in July 1944. The 4th and 5th Battalions landed at Saint-Malo as part of the 155th Brigade in the 52nd (Lowland) Division in June 1940 for service with the British Expeditionary Force; after evacuation from Cherbourg later in the month they took part in Operation Infatuate in November 1944 and the subsequent capture of Bremen in April 1945. The 6th Battalion took part in the Normandy landings as part of the 44th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in June 1944 and saw action at the Battle for Caen later that month and then advanced into Germany. One of its heaviest losses during the war was at the ill-fated Battle of Arnhem in which the 7th Battalion, as part of the 1st Airlanding Brigade of 1st Airborne Division, suffered 90% casualties in September 1944;[16] they defended the perimeter in Oosterbeek against 2nd SS Panzer Corps.This example is in a nicely issued condition.

Code: 51419Price:


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A good example of a mid war period un-issued No.6 Commando shoulder title

This is a neat example of a mid war period numbered un-issued No.6 Commando shoulder title. Formed in July 1940, No. 6 Commando's first involvement in operations came in late 1941 when it contributed small forces to raids in Norway. In April 1942 the whole unit was scheduled to take part in Operation Myrmidon, in France, but this raid was eventually cancelled. As a result, the first full-scale operation that No. 6 Commando took part in was Operation Torch, the Allied landings in Algeria in November 1942. Later, it joined the advance into Tunisia in 1943. On 6 June 1944, it participated in the D-Day landings in France as part of Operation Overlord, coming ashore with the 1st Special Service Brigade which was tasked with linking up with the troops from the 6th Airborne Division on the eastern flank of Sword. Following this, No. 6 Commando were used in the defence of the beachhead and the subsequent operations to break out from Normandy before being withdrawn with the rest of the brigade back to the United Kingdom in September 1944. In January 1945, they took part in the Allied counterattack during the Ardennes Offensive before joining the advance into Germany as part of Operation Plunder. With the end of hostilities, the unit was disbanded in 1946. This example is in a nice and un-issued condition.

Code: 51418Price: 25.00 EUR


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A printed British made 1st Infantry Division divisional patch

This is a nice example of a printed British made 1st Infantry Division divisional patch. After the Division had been fighting in Sicily and Italy they were tranffered in 1945 to Holland. Committed in the western Netherlands, they attacked across the Ijsselmeer in mid-April and speedily cleared the enemy out of Apeldoorn. In the last days of the war the Division was halted on the Grebbe Line, some miles east of Utrecht, to facilitate Allied arrangements with the Germans for feeding the starving Dutch population.

Code: 51415Price:

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