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Out of Print book : Nine Days at Arnhem. Canadian Officers - Under the Canloan Scheme - In the 7th (Galloway) Battalion - The Kings Own Scottish Borderers - 1st British Airborne Division Canada, UK, Holland and Norway 1944 - 1945.

Out of Print book : Nine Days at Arnhem. Canadian Officers - Under the Canloan Scheme - In the 7th (Galloway) Battalion - The Kings Own Scottish Borderers - 1st British Airborne Division Canada, UK, Holland and Norway 1944 - 1945.


This is a sealed copy of Nine Days at Arnhem. Canadian Officers - Under the Canloan Scheme - In the 7th (Galloway) Battalion - The Kings Own Scottish Borderers - 1st British Airborne Division Canada, UK, Holland and Norway 1944 - 1945. R.N. Sigmond Publishing, Renkum, 2004. cloth / linnen hardcover. Condition: as new / nieuwstaat. Dust Jacket Condition: as new / nieuwstaat. 1ste / 1st. New book in publishers folie. Book with dust jacket in very good condition. 180 pages. Photographs, maps, documents. English text / engelstalig. CANLOAN = 700 Canadians volunteerd temporarily with the British Forces. This book looks at the actions of a small group CANLOAN Officers who by either accident or design ended up serving with the 7th Battalion The King's Own Scottish Borderers. This unit in 1944 was part of the 1st Airlanding Brigade of the 1st Airborne Division and was destined to be thrown into the firestorm of Arnhem in September 1944. This book complements the previous work "Off at Last" by the same author but enables the reader to look more closely at the actions of the Canadians in the 7th KOSB.

Code: 51436

SOLD


A nice and difficult to find RIGHT facing embroided Wessex Divisional arm patch

A nice and difficult to find RIGHT facing embroided Wessex Divisional arm patch

This is a good example of a nice and difficult to find RIGHT facing embroided Wessex Divisional arm patch. First formed as the Wessex Division in the Territorial Force in 1908, the division was broken up during World War I and never served as a complete formation. Reformed in the TA in 1920, it served with distinction in World War II in the campaign in North West Europe from June 1944 until May 1945, suffering heavy casualties but gaining an excellent reputation and was known to the Germans as the Yellow Devils. This example is in a nice un-issued condition.

Code: 51435

20.00 EUR


A nice British made Canadian 14 CTR (Canadian Tank Regiment) shoulder patch

A nice British made Canadian 14 CTR (Canadian Tank Regiment) shoulder patch


This is a good example of a nice British made Canadian 14 CTR (Canadian Tank Regiment) shoulder patch. On 16 February 1941, the 14th Army Tank Batalion (Calgary Regiment) was mobilized at Mewata Barracks. When the Canadian Armoured Corps was created, the Calgary Regiment lost its status as an infantry regiment and transferred to the new corps. A reserve regiment remained in Calgary. The regiment was composed of 400 members of the reserve battalion, drawing also from reinforcement personnel from The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada and the Edmonton Regiment. The original 'A' Squadron was drawn from Olds and district, 'B' Squadron from Stettler area, 'C' Squadron from Red Deer, and Headquarters from Calgary, High River, and Okotoks district. In March 1941 the regiment moved to Camp Borden, becoming part of the First Army Tank Brigade and in June 1941 sailed for Great Britain. Matilda tanks were initially used on the Salisbury Plains, but these were replaced later in the year by the first manufactured Churchills. The overseas unit trained on various vehicles in Canada and the United Kingdom, and in August 1942 took the Churchill tank into battle for the first time at Dieppe. In late February 1945 the regiment was moved to Leghorn and embarked to Marseilles, France, where it moved by rail to the North-West Europe theatre. The regiment moved to the Reichswald Forest and on 12 April 1945 fought in the Second Battle of Arnhem, supporting the 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division to Ede, the Netherlands. The regiment's final actions of the Second World War were in support of the 1st Belgium Brigade in clearing the resistance between the Nederrijn and Waal Rivers. When the overseas unit returned to Canada in 1945, it was disbanded, and the Calgary Regiment continued its service as a reserve armoured unit.

Code: 51434

SOLD


A nice printed British made - albeit regrettably single - Beach Group shoulder insignia

A nice printed British made - albeit regrettably single - Beach Group shoulder insignia


This is a neat example of a nice printed British made - albeit regrettably single - Beach Group shoulder insignia. During the Second World War, the Allies realised the need for the landing zone of an amphibious assault to be organised for the efficient passage of follow on forces. The British formed such units from all three services – the Royal Navy (Commandos), British Army and the Royal Air Force, with the Army component comprising Infantry, Engineers, Ordnance, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Medical and Service Corps. The equivalent U.S. units were called "beach battalions."

Code: 51433

SOLD


A nice and RARE to find Officers and other ranks The 49th (West Riding) Reconnaissance Regiment cap i.e beret badge

A nice and RARE to find Officers and other ranks The 49th (West Riding) Reconnaissance Regiment cap i.e beret badge


This is a neat example of a rare WW2 Reconnaissance Corps 49th West Riding Division beret badge, white metal example with a Yorkshire rose to the centre. The 49th (West Riding) DIVISION was a pre-war territorial formation consisting of the 146th, 147th & 148th Brigades. The first two recruited in Yorkshire and the third in the Notts. & Derbyshire area. The 49th REGIMENT was formed in September, 1942 from the 29th & 148th Independent Squadrons of the Reconnaissance Corps (formed January, 1941) which were attached to the 49th Division, along with the 1st Belgian Fusiliers (replaced in December, 1942 by the 24th (Guards) Independent Squadron). In accordance with normal Reconnaissance Corps practise this new regiment was given the same number as the division with which it would serve - the 49th. This example is in a nice issued condition and still got his original cotter pin present. Hard to find these days.

Code: 51432

365.00 EUR


Out of print book : 2nd revised and enhanced print Desert Rise - Arnhem Descent, the 10th Parachute Battalion in the Second World War by Martin Peters and Niall Cherry with John Howes & Graham Francis SIGNED COPY

Out of print book : 2nd revised and enhanced print Desert Rise - Arnhem Descent, the 10th Parachute Battalion in the Second World War by Martin Peters and Niall Cherry with John Howes & Graham Francis SIGNED COPY


This is a nice, almost mint example of a 2017 2nd revised and enhanced print softback Desert Rise - Arnhem Descent, the 10th Parachute Battalion in the Second World War by Martin Peters and Niall Cherry with John Howes & Graham Francis. Desert Rise - Arnhem Descent covers the story of the 10th Parachute Battalion during its short life in the Second World War, from the formation of the unit in the Western Desert in 1942, their actions in Italy and extensive coverage of their ill-fated Battle at Arnhem in September 1944. The book has 296 Pages with approx 120 black and white photographs, various documents, maps and aerial photographs. Limited edition.

Code: 51431

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A nice post war made camoflaged para cord Royal Corps of Signals 216 Parachute Signal Squadron lanyard

A nice post war made camoflaged para cord Royal Corps of Signals 216 Parachute Signal Squadron lanyard


This is a neat example of a post war made camoflaged para cord Royal Corps of Signals 216 Parachute Signal Squadron lanyard. Immediately following the landings in Normandy by 6th Airborne Divisional Signals on 6 June 1944, the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel 'Pygmy' Smallman- Tew, encouraged each man to plait for himself a lanyard from the camouflaged rigging lines of parachutes still scattered on the DZs.

The aim of this exercise was to ensure that each man had in his possession a length of strong cord which might be useful should he be involved in any future attempt to escape capture by the enemy. All soldiers carried out their Commanding Officer's wish and the lanyard was worn by all ranks. Some weeks after the landings, Lieutenant Colonel Smallman-Tew, although wounded in the arm by a piece of shrapnel, elected to remain at duty and took it upon himself to take a newly joined officer, Lieutenant Much, to his Brigade Signal Section (K) at Le Mesnil. On 22 July 1944, on the journey by airborne jeep, Lieutenant Colonel Smallman-Tew , Lieutenant Much and their driver were killed when a German mortar shell hit their vehicle near Escoville. Lieutenant Colonel Smallman- Tew was extremely popular throughout the Regiment and the lanyard continued to be worn after his death as was his wish. The special camouflaged rigging lines were later obtained from RAF sources as it was traditional that each man plaited his own lanyard. After the war, the camouflaged rigging lines of the X type statichute were obtained from the manufacturers. Brigadier D A Pringle, who at the time was the Commanding Officer of 6th Airborne Divisional Signal Regiment, recalls that in 1947 he wrote to the GQ Parachute Company of Woking in an attempt to buy rigging line. The owners of the Company sent to the Regiment with their compliments and blessing, their entire residual stock as a present. The Regiment at this time was fortunate in that a Signalman who had been in the Merchant Navy was an expert at knotting. He soon became a one man lanyard factory. It was not unti1 1954 that an official request was made by 16th Independent Parachute Group Signal Squadron for the lanyard to be recognised officially. In the same year, the request was granted and the lanyard became formally recognised as an official embellishment and therefore became available from Ordnance sources. The lanyard has been proudly worn since 1944 by all ranks of airborne signals units in direct descent from 6th Airborne Divisional Signals in memory of Lieutenant Colonel Smallman-Tew. It continues to be worn today with equal pride by all signallers of 6th Field Force HQ and Signal Squadron.

Code: 51430

SOLD


A nice little Belgium national flag as intended to wear by Belgium volunteers on there upper arm of there battle-dress blouse

A nice little Belgium national flag as intended to wear by Belgium volunteers on there upper arm of there battle-dress blouse


I was lucky to find recently a small Belgium or British made Belgium national flags as intended to wear by all ranks of the Belgium volunteers who were part of the Allied Army's in England during the war. Members of No 4 Troop, No 10 Commando (I.A.) wore these flags below the No.10 Commando shoulder title on there right shoulder. These Belgian flag's are difficult to find and are is a nice and un-issued condition.

Code: 51429

35.00 EUR


A nice British made Canadian 14 CTR (Canadian Tank Regiment) shoulder patch

A nice British made Canadian 14 CTR (Canadian Tank Regiment) shoulder patch


This is a good example of a nice British made Canadian 14 CTR (Canadian Tank Regiment) shoulder patch. On 16 February 1941, the 14th Army Tank Batalion (Calgary Regiment) was mobilized at Mewata Barracks. When the Canadian Armoured Corps was created, the Calgary Regiment lost its status as an infantry regiment and transferred to the new corps. A reserve regiment remained in Calgary. The regiment was composed of 400 members of the reserve battalion, drawing also from reinforcement personnel from The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada and the Edmonton Regiment. The original 'A' Squadron was drawn from Olds and district, 'B' Squadron from Stettler area, 'C' Squadron from Red Deer, and Headquarters from Calgary, High River, and Okotoks district. In March 1941 the regiment moved to Camp Borden, becoming part of the First Army Tank Brigade and in June 1941 sailed for Great Britain. Matilda tanks were initially used on the Salisbury Plains, but these were replaced later in the year by the first manufactured Churchills. The overseas unit trained on various vehicles in Canada and the United Kingdom, and in August 1942 took the Churchill tank into battle for the first time at Dieppe. In late February 1945 the regiment was moved to Leghorn and embarked to Marseilles, France, where it moved by rail to the North-West Europe theatre. The regiment moved to the Reichswald Forest and on 12 April 1945 fought in the Second Battle of Arnhem, supporting the 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division to Ede, the Netherlands. The regiment's final actions of the Second World War were in support of the 1st Belgium Brigade in clearing the resistance between the Nederrijn and Waal Rivers. When the overseas unit returned to Canada in 1945, it was disbanded, and the Calgary Regiment continued its service as a reserve armoured unit.

Code: 51428

SOLD


A nice mid wartime period British made embroided Canadian Provost Corps shoulder title

A nice mid wartime period British made embroided Canadian Provost Corps shoulder title


This is a neat example of a nice mid wartime British made embroided Canadian Provost Corps shoulder title. In mid June 1940, the Canadian Provost Corps was officially born out of 1 Provost Company. For most of 1940, 1 Provost Company was stationed in England, but was involved in the battles during the fall of France. The Canadian Provost Corps Training Centre operated from November 1942 to May 1946, training a total of 1,897 all ranks. During World War II, most of the Canadian Army in England was stationed at Aldershot. The corps saw action for the first time on 18 August 1942 in the Dieppe Raid. During 1943, 1 Provost Company became involved in operations in Sicily and after the crossing into Italy on 3 September 1943, the company continued its support of the I Canadian Corps as part of the Eighth Army as Allied forces crept northwards from the toe of Italy. The Canadians were part of twenty-four provost and traffic control companies and two Special Investigation Branch sections that were attached to the Eighth Army. Shortly after the Normandy landings in June 1944, the 2nd Canadian Line of Communications (LoC) Provost HQ and six sections were deployed in Northern France on traffic control duties. 1 Provost Company also saw action at Apeldoorn in the Netherlands. On 18 October 1945, 1 Provost Company was de-activated when it was repatriated to Canada. This example is in a perfect un-issued condtion.

Code: 51427

35.00 EUR